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dc.contributor.advisorLucas, Alastair R.
dc.contributor.authorOgunyemi, Dayo Adeniyi
dc.date2019-11
dc.date.accessioned2019-08-13T14:23:23Z
dc.date.available2019-08-13T14:23:23Z
dc.date.issued2019-08-01
dc.identifier.citationOgunyemi, D. A. (2019). The Right to Be Cold: Examining the Indigenous Peoples’ Rights and Climate Change (Unpublished master's thesis). University of Calgary, Calgary, AB.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1880/110714
dc.description.abstractThe reality of climate change and its adverse implication on the human and environmental rights of the Inuit is no longer in doubt. The observed impacts of climate change in the Arctic region confirm that the change in climate has violated the fundamental human rights of the Inuit inhabiting the Arctic region, the integrity of the Arctic ecosystem, and also the environmental “right to be cold”. Emissions of greenhouse gases primarily due to human activities have contributed monumentally to climate change, and these emissions have, over the years, been encouraged by the actions or inactions of States. The principle that “where there is a right, there is a remedy” prompts the search for legal remedies within the international human rights system to address the impacts of climate change on the Inuit and the Arctic region. This thesis addresses the legal and regulatory framework that can be adopted to address the impact of climate change on Northern Indigenous peoples. The question of whether current global regimes on climate change provide an effective mechanism for the Peoples of the Arctic to seek redress to defend their culture and way of life is also addressed. This thesis argues that the Inuit may find an effective mechanism to seek redress within the existing United Nations and Inter-American human rights systems.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.rightsUniversity of Calgary graduate students retain copyright ownership and moral rights for their thesis. You may use this material in any way that is permitted by the Copyright Act or through licensing that has been assigned to the document. For uses that are not allowable under copyright legislation or licensing, you are required to seek permission.en_US
dc.subjectThe Right to be Colden_US
dc.subjectClimate Changeen_US
dc.subjectThe Inuiten_US
dc.subjectIndigenous Peoplesen_US
dc.subjectGlobal Warmingen_US
dc.subjectThe Arctic Regionen_US
dc.subjectFundamental human rightsen_US
dc.subjectEnvironmental rightsen_US
dc.subjectThe Right to a Healthy Environmenten_US
dc.subjectInternational human rights systemen_US
dc.subjectRegional human rights systemen_US
dc.subjectIndigenous Peoples’ Rightsen_US
dc.subjectEmissions of greenhouse gasesen_US
dc.subjectThe Kyoto Protocolen_US
dc.subjectThe Paris Agreementen_US
dc.subjectThe United Nations Human Rights Systemen_US
dc.subjectThe Inter-American Human Rights Systemen_US
dc.subjectThe Inuit Petitionen_US
dc.subjectThe Athabaskan Petitionen_US
dc.subjectThe Inuit’s Caseen_US
dc.subject.classificationLawen_US
dc.titleThe Right to Be Cold: Examining the Indigenous Peoples’ Rights and Climate Changeen_US
dc.typemaster thesisen_US
dc.publisher.facultyLawen_US
dc.publisher.institutionUniversity of Calgaryen
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Lawsen_US
thesis.degree.nameLLM
thesis.degree.disciplineLawen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Calgaryen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberOshionebo, Evaristus
dc.contributor.committeememberIngelson, Allan
ucalgary.item.requestcopyfalseen_US


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