Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorMcCormack, Gavin R.
dc.contributor.authorConsoli, Anna
dc.date2019-11
dc.date.accessioned2019-08-13T15:59:04Z
dc.date.available2019-08-13T15:59:04Z
dc.date.issued2019-08-12
dc.identifier.citationConsoli, A. (2019). Neighbourhood walkability associated with initiation of, and adherence to, a pedometer-based physical activity intervention among inactive Canadian adults (Unpublished master's thesis). University of Calgary, Calgary, AB.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1880/110718
dc.description.abstractConsistent evidence suggests that the built environment can influence physical activity. However, the extent to which the neighbourhood built environment constrains or amplifies the effectiveness of physical activity interventions is understudied. The aim of this thesis was to investigate the role of the neighbourhood built environment in constraining or facilitating the effectiveness of a 12-week internet-facilitated pedometer-based physical activity intervention (UWALK) among inactive adults. Specifically, this thesis examined the effects of the objectively-measured neighbourhood built environment (i.e., walkability estimated via Walk Score®) and the self-reported (perceived) neighbourhood built environment on adoption of, adherence to the UWALK intervention, and levels of pedometer-measured physical activity. A quasi-experiment was undertaken in Calgary between May 2016 and August 2017 which included 573 inactive adults. Self-reported walkability was positively associated with pedometer-measured physical activity. Walk Score® was not significantly associated with pedometer-measured physical activity. Neither objectively-measured walkability or perceived walkability were significantly associated with UWALK adoption or adherence outcomes. Strategies for targeting neighbourhood perceptions may improve the effectiveness of physical activity interventions.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.rightsUniversity of Calgary graduate students retain copyright ownership and moral rights for their thesis. You may use this material in any way that is permitted by the Copyright Act or through licensing that has been assigned to the document. For uses that are not allowable under copyright legislation or licensing, you are required to seek permission.en_US
dc.subjectpedometer; intervention; built environment; physical activity; walkabilityen_US
dc.subject.classificationEducation--Healthen_US
dc.subject.classificationPublic Healthen_US
dc.titleNeighbourhood walkability associated with initiation of, and adherence to, a pedometer-based physical activity intervention among inactive Canadian adultsen_US
dc.typemaster thesisen_US
dc.publisher.facultyCumming School of Medicineen_US
dc.publisher.institutionUniversity of Calgaryen
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Science (MSc)en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineMedicine – Community Health Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Calgaryen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberNettel-Aguirre, Alberto
dc.contributor.committeememberSpence, John R.
dc.contributor.committeememberYang, Lin
ucalgary.item.requestcopytrueen_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Embargoed until: 2020-02-12

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record