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dc.contributor.advisorVenturato, Lorraine
dc.contributor.authorRobinson, Tanis Arlene La Rose
dc.date2020-11
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-16T16:58:47Z
dc.date.available2020-09-16T16:58:47Z
dc.date.issued2020-09-14
dc.identifier.citationRobinson, T. A. L. R. (2020). Continuing the Dance: A Constructivist Grounded Theory of Understanding Transitions of Rural Couples with Parkinson's Disease (Unpublished doctoral thesis). University of Calgary, Calgary, AB.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1880/112535
dc.description.abstractParkinson’s disease (PD) is a complex chronic debilitating neurological disease characterized by muscle stiffness, rigidity, tremors, and postural imbalances – making it the second most common neurological disorder in Canada after Alzheimer’s disease. PD affects more men than women, diagnosis occurs around age 60, no known cause or cure exists, and rural living has been linked as a known risk factor. Little extant research helps us understand the rural couple’s experience and the processes used to adapt and transition to living with PD. As a result, adaptations and transitions of couples living in rural areas and implications to accessing health care services were explored. Constructivist grounded theory methodology guided this study. Purposeful sampling was used to recruit five couples and one additional participant living in rural areas, in which one spouse was diagnosed with PD, for a total of 11 participants. Five open-ended intensive joint interviews and one single intensive interview were conducted and transcribed verbatim. Charmaz’s constructivist grounded theory analysis steps were used to guide analysis of the data. Participants described their experience of living with PD in rural areas as an innate process of adapting, planning, and managing PD that allowed them to transition together, as a couple. Their main concern was learning how to negotiate the adaptations and transitions together – continuing a dance they began together many years ago. Through “negotiating the dance” together, couples “choreographed the dance,” “danced together,” and experienced “Adagio–Changing the Tempo.” As a result, they “continue the dance” every day. Recommendations for further research on rural couples with PD and the broader Parkinson’s community are also made.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.rightsUniversity of Calgary graduate students retain copyright ownership and moral rights for their thesis. You may use this material in any way that is permitted by the Copyright Act or through licensing that has been assigned to the document. For uses that are not allowable under copyright legislation or licensing, you are required to seek permission.en_US
dc.subjectParkinson's diseaseen_US
dc.subjectruralen_US
dc.subjectcoupleen_US
dc.subjecttransitionsen_US
dc.subjectconstructivist grounded theoryen_US
dc.subjectqualitative researchen_US
dc.subject.classificationNursingen_US
dc.titleContinuing the Dance: A Constructivist Grounded Theory of Understanding Transitions of Rural Couples with Parkinson's Diseaseen_US
dc.typedoctoral thesisen_US
dc.publisher.facultyNursingen_US
dc.publisher.institutionUniversity of Calgaryen
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophy (PhD)en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNursingen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Calgaryen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBouchal, Shelley Raffin
dc.contributor.committeememberGreen, Theresa L.
ucalgary.item.requestcopytrueen_US


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University of Calgary graduate students retain copyright ownership and moral rights for their thesis. You may use this material in any way that is permitted by the Copyright Act or through licensing that has been assigned to the document. For uses that are not allowable under copyright legislation or licensing, you are required to seek permission.